Transparency

May 19 – June 29, 2024
Wellfleet Preservation Hall

Katrina Abbott
Water Column 2

The ocean covers about 71% of the Earth’s surface. Organisms as large as the blue whale and as small as a microscopic phytoplankton are part of this environment. Phytoplankton are so small, that you might find over a million in a teaspoon full of ocean water, and these organisms produce up to 50% of the oxygen we breathe. As humans continue to take our environment for granted, we risk not only sea level rise and increasing radical weather, but the decimation of species, both in the ocean and on land. Do your part by being careful, limiting your pollution, reusing and recycling.

In Water Column 2, I have represented a number of phytoplankton floating in the water column of the ocean using a collagraph print, watercolor and wax. I find them beautiful and frequently use their images in my art.

katrinasabbott.com

Lola Baltzell
Chance Words I Hear

I have been thinking about transparency a lot recently — both as a psychotherapist and an (inadvertent?) consumer of social media. In my therapy work, more and more I see the importance of restraint — to be more thoughtful in our speech. Our cultural fascination with “total honesty” does not really work very well in our interpersonal worlds. “Think before you speak” is a good guideline. And the same is true in the political realm. What has come to be accepted as “normal” political rhetoric has created so much hatred and violence in not only American culture but all over the world. This painting is many layered – some boldness, some restraint. The truth lies somewhere in between the polarization.

lolart.com

Edith Beatty
Centering the Heart

The dance between transparency and opacity is what first attracted me to encaustic painting… the lovely way in which multiple layers of molten pigmented wax, each fused in the process, conceal and reveal images, colors, and textures beneath.

In my meditation practice, I am constantly aware of another dance between centering the heart, quieting the noise within, and hearing the many intruding thoughts of my “monkey mind”. Each of these states is important to its respective practice.

In painting, a very meditative process for me, I try to achieve an opaque genesis to the work, while building layer upon layer of emerging and receding translucent gestures, marks, and images. Some remain visible, or at least translucent, while others virtually disappear, leaving behind nothing but tiny ghosts of their past existence. How like life… like meditation… like encaustic painting.

Centering the Heart, from a series about the seasons of my life, is encaustic and embraces the show theme, transparency.

edithbeatty.com

Edith Beatty
Thoughts

The dance between transparency and opacity is what first attracted me to encaustic painting… the lovely way in which multiple layers of molten pigmented wax, each fused in the process, conceal and reveal images, colors, and textures beneath.

In my meditation practice, I am constantly aware of another dance between centering the heart, quieting the noise within, and hearing the many intruding thoughts of my “monkey mind”. Each of these states is important to its respective practice.

In painting, a very meditative process for me, I try to achieve an opaque genesis to the work, while building layer upon layer of emerging and receding translucent gestures, marks, and images. Some remain visible, or at least translucent, while others virtually disappear, leaving behind nothing but tiny ghosts of their past existence. How like life… like meditation… like encaustic painting.

Thoughts, from a series about the seasons of my life, is encaustic and embraces the show theme, transparency.

edithbeatty.com

Hilary Hanson Bruel
Clark’s Island XV

I have painted many versions of this view from the west side of Clark’s Island, located right off the coast of Duxbury, MA. While the colors and light differ among the paintings in the series, the view remains the same. This iterative process provides a consistent framework that allows me to explore the properties and possibilities of my materials as I create a sense of space and distance with bands of varying sizes, colors, and textures.

This piece reflects my increasing focus on the transparent quality of encaustic, and the luminosity and depth that can be created through the layering and mixing of translucent colors. In some areas, a coating of iridescent pastel floats atop the wax, while fine strands of thread strung across the surface add contrasting dimension and sharpness.

hansonbruel.com

Lisa Cohen
Great Blue Heron

These mixed media projects include transferred images onto cloth, encaustic wax, rice paper and ink. The transparency created in this process illuminates the images, giving them a lifelike feel.

During Covid I started walking in nature photographing birds. I also spent hours a day creating artwork, which kept me busy during such an isolated and tumultuous time. I began combining my photographs and my painting to create mixed media works. I found that using encaustic paint in conjunction with my photographs gave them a light which like in photography, is critical. I have learned so much about myself in the process of my artistic journeys. Photographing nature is never predictable or controllable, as in life, you just need to be patient. Painting is for me a journey. I start with something in mind and most often, end out somewhere totally unexpected.

lisacohenart.com

Lisa Cohen
Kathe on the move

These mixed media projects include transferred images onto cloth, encaustic wax, rice paper and ink. The transparency created in this process illuminates the images, giving them a lifelike feel.

This piece is about my grandmother and her journey getting her family out of Europe during the Holocaust. My grandmother had such a strong character and the more I delve into this project the more I peel away the layers of her personality and strength. I hope to use the transparency of this artwork to exemplify that people have so many sides to their personalities and it’s impossible to see through them and know what was on their mind. I would have loved to have known what my grandmother was thinking during her arduous journey, but instead I can only imagine.

lisacohenart.com

Angel Dean
The Age of Aquarium

I learned to swim when I was two years old. We had a pool in our backyard and my parents didn’t want me to drown. I can remember frantically dog-paddling my way to my father’s arms. As I look back at my early impressionable years, I see myself at Weeki Wachi World in Silver Springs, Florida watching the beautiful mermaids sip Orange Crush underwater. My father took us to Florida twice a year and I thought we were moving there. I dreamt of swimming with Flipper.

The water’s edge is traditionally the border of fantasy lands, mythic countries, and visionary possibilities. The Age of Aquarium was created using layers upon layers of transferred ink from copy paper. The ink remains and the paper is lifted off the surface. Using this layering technique allows the viewer to see deep within the painting, drawn into a fantastic world of undersea realms and timeless wonder.

angeldean.net

Pamela Dorris DeJong
Each Day A New Beginning

Gauzy, gossamer, ethereal, and delicate, silhouettes of diaphanous humanoids have their arms spread wide as if they have opened a curtain in a thin wispy mist. They portray the hope human beings must bring to embark on each new day. Seven monoprints depict the days of the week to represent the idea of each day being a new beginning. In this piece, daily life is pared down to people facing each day with purpose. Exactly what that day may bring lies ahead. 

Each new day is a quest for truth, clarity, and wisdom. Approaching life with openness and honesty may help guide us to the truths that seem shadowy or unclear. Our vision and outlook are filtered by our attitudes and those of people around us. I look deeper, underneath deceptions, misdirection, ignorance, and outright lies, for the foundations, the bottom-line truth, or the most important fact. I often think of the old adage: “The truth shall be revealed.” 

Because transparency and clarity are goals in all my relationships, I want to depict that concept in the creation of my art. Rice paper and several layers of cold wax are used here and are a metaphor for the translucency and transparency I seek. 

pameladorrisdejong.com

Heather Leigh Douglas
Through a City Window

Cities often seem impenetrable and dense, however the amount of glass comprised in the buildings leads one to rethink that notion. On the street level one can look through shop windows and glass doorways. Inside buildings, ranging from centuries old, to modern day skyscrapers, you can look out at a myriad of windows, in all directions.

My literal brain thinks of glass in relation to transparency. The encaustic medium allows me to layer toner images of city windows, on top of one another, and still see the images throughout the different layers.

A favorite childhood book of mine, Harold and the Purple Crayon by Crockett Johnson, in which Harold draws himself into a city of windows, was also an inspiration for this piece.

heatherdouglas.com

Hélène Farrar
What We Carry: We All Have Light

We are more complicated than we think we are. We are even more complicated than the stories we tell. We react and respond to the world without one breath in between. We don’t see each other. Things are speeding up and heating up. When has it become normal for one to disengage with each other, to not see the light we all carry? Our individual “lights” are becoming increasingly difficult to shine and almost dim. The climate and the cultural climate are becoming increasingly “heated”. The challenge is to slow down, to notice the depth of our individual and collective light, to experience the variations of light (transparent, bright, brilliant, cool) and to offer our witness. 

HeleneFarrar.com

Dona Mara Friedman
Quiet Waters

Quiet Waters was conceived in response to the callous disregard for the earth’s water. 

As I worked on this painting the quality of molten wax with its changing forms, was reminiscent of water. Whether flowing, still, cold, hot, clear or murky both wax and water can be compared to human conditions. Their transparency is an illusion with multiple layers often hidden from the initial view. As the viewer gazes at my painting, they may see into the forms and layers to appreciate the precious honesty of our waters.

donamarafriedman.com

Kay Hartung
Geocolor 15

My artwork is direct, up front, and honest. It is transparent and dispenses with hidden meanings or elusive messages, instead becoming a celebration of color, form, and texture in their purest, most unfiltered states. I am drawn to the inherent precision and visual impact of the geometric forms, but I also introduce some organic elements that suggest a sense of whimsy. The varying textural surfaces add depth and tactile richness to the composition and invite the viewer to explore and engage on a visceral level. 

The shaped painting takes on an identity and personality of its own, transcending the boundaries of mere visual representations. I see the piece as a character, slightly imbalanced and whimsical, full of color and contrast. As I developed this series, I began to think about what sounds the characters might make. My husband Paul, a musician, has composed short tunes to go along with the work. Through the exploration of color relationships and the interplay of abstract elements, I strive to create a space where hope and vibrancy flourish. My work is transparent, and I hope it communicates joy and happiness to the viewer. 

kayhartung.com

Anne Hebebrand
A Carpet of Gold

The title A Carpet of Gold came to me very quickly after I finished this painting. The golden tones radiate warmth casting a luminous, transparent glow over the layers upon layers of texture and depth, created by the interplay of oil paint and cold wax medium. The tactile quality of the surface invites further introspection of the underlying layers, creating a rich history. The Indian yellow, a strong transparent pigment, allows color and light to pass through. Working with transparent colors creates luminous effects in paintings, offering a rich dimension.

My paintings are maps of memories that are in dialogue with one another. Colors and shapes evolve organically and bring each painting, with its own distinct composition and feeling, to life. I am guided by the process of layering paint, and excavating and unearthing earlier layers, until the moment arrives when everything seems to fall into place. 

annehebebrand.com

Sue Katz
Family Tree

I call these abstract works “constructs” combining encaustic paint and found objects. I assemble these found treasures putting them together with an inner eye focused on meaning. Painterly gesture within structure, rich earthy surfaces within formal shapes describe decades/generations. Process and materials fuse together forming content of family/lineage. As I work, I enjoy the procedural; as I finish, I wonder about the conceptual; thought and language reveal the title, the spirit of relationships and connections. 

This work of two quadratyches depicts four generations, each of four 12” squares denoting parents, husband and wife, children and their children/grandchildren. Note that the transparent color is denser on top with the older generation and lighter on bottom with the very young generation. The color and shape are similar in both columns. The encaustic paint (wax based) is applied to the metal surface in several washes of rusty red brown with minor areas of black and yellow and white, all heated with a blow gun to a thin transparency to the point of starting to drip.

suekatzart.com

Janet Lesniak
sand.sea.sky

I am inspired by landscape; the fusing of the dramatic vistas that I have been blessed to live in and the unseen internal landscape. As a lifelong student of contemplative practices, this merging of the physical/visible with the emotional/experienced is what interests me. Color, contour and light revealed in these imagined land and seascapes are the foundation of my work. Encaustic offers the opportunity to express my attraction to bold color with my passion for translucency; the unexpected play of light between layers of wax that gives life and expression to imagination.

janetlesniak.com

Janet Lesniak
sea.sky

I am inspired by landscape; the fusing of the dramatic vistas that I have been blessed to live in and the unseen internal landscape. As a lifelong student of contemplative practices, this merging of the physical/visible with the emotional/experienced is what interests me. Color, contour and light revealed in these imagined land and seascapes are the foundation of my work. Encaustic offers the opportunity to express my attraction to bold color with my passion for translucency; the unexpected play of light between layers of wax that gives life and expression to imagination.

janetlesniak.com

Ross Ozer
Wheels I

I’m fascinated by simple geometric shapes. My version of the wheel has become central to many of the pieces. The introduction of dots within the solid form and bold color combinations allows the white to act as a transparent backdrop to the composition.

In this piece, I’ve used a wax stylus writer with both opaque and transparent pigments to create fun juxtapositions of color and a raised texture that’s reminiscent of needlepoint.

rjostudio.art

Deborah Peeples
Undulation

This painting is part of a series that shares a grid structure and semiotic language, forming a narrative where shapes act as distinct characters. Circles, central to my work, evoke concepts of wholeness, the symbolic voids within us, lifecycle, and femaleness. The re-articulation of these shapes emphasizes their existence, presence, and a yearning to be seen. Lines intersect the surface, creating a dichotomy of openness and impenetrability.

As an adoptee, my art mirrors my exploration of identity and the pursuit of belonging. In deciding what to reveal or conceal, I grapple with both fear and longing for authentic visibility. In this work, the interaction between exposed and obscured layers serves as a metaphor for emotional transparency, reflecting the interplay between vulnerability and resilience.

debpeeples.com

Deborah Pressman
Glaciers: Bird’s Eye View

Transparency/opacity — yin and yang— each celebrates the other in a dynamic conversation. 

One lets light through, the other reflects light. 

A recent trip to the glaciers of Iceland is the inspiration for my current work. The surface of ice — white and reflective, deep ice crevices varying shades of transparent blues. Cold wax is the ideal medium to create this type of transparency and opacity. 

deborahpressman.com

Deborah Pressman
Ice Shards

Transparency/opacity — yin and yang— each celebrates the other in a dynamic conversation. 

One lets light through, the other reflects light. 

A recent trip to the glaciers of Iceland is the inspiration for my current work. The surface of ice — white and reflective, deep ice crevices varying shades of transparent blues. Cold wax is the ideal medium to create this type of transparency and opacity. 

deborahpressman.com

Stephanie Roberts-Camello
Preserved

Assembling a history plays an important role in my encaustic painting. I use old family letters from the 20’s-40’s. I come from a long line of cowboys and farmers in West Texas. They reference the Dust Bowl, the Great Depression, and difficulty keeping cattle alive as well as the ongoing drought that decimated the farm lands. Experimenting with encaustic forms I found a relationship in the stress marks and layers. I began combining these letters with eco printing and rusted papers below the surface as metaphors for struggles and endurance. Their stains, information and wear, reference the past. Many layers of wax are applied and literally cover up the past. Encaustic as it cools retains every scrape and scar.

The letter in Preserved is much more docile. My grandmother wrote this in 1947 in West Texas and at that time they didn’t have a freezer but went into town where they rented a locker to store their meats and the many canned vegetables and fruits. In those days, they would have a whole cow butchered and even today, that would not fit in anyone’s freezer! There is a piece of rusted silk over that part of the letter where you can read through.

stephanierobertscamello.com

Stephanie Roberts-Camello
Voyage

Assembling a history plays an important role in my encaustic painting. I use old family letters from the 20’s-40’s. I come from a long line of cowboys and farmers in West Texas. They reference the Dust Bowl, the Great Depression, and difficulty keeping cattle alive as well as the ongoing drought that decimated the farm lands. Experimenting with encaustic forms I found a relationship in the stress marks and layers. I began combining these letters with eco printing and rusted papers below the surface as metaphors for struggles and endurance. Their stains, information and wear, reference the past. Many layers of wax are applied and literally cover up the past. Encaustic as it cools retains every scrape and scar.

I worked on Voyage on and off for a few years. As I built up the layers and patterns, I had forgotten about the content of the letter. Written by a Great Aunt in the 20’s in West Texas, she recounts the event of a confrontation with two men where one threw a chair at the other and the other man stabbed him. A little snippet of the wild west! What pulled this piece together for me was the two encaustic textural forms and I can’t help but relate it to the two men who were fighting.

stephanierobertscamello.com

Lia Rothstein
Lightform 1

My Lightform series is about the ways that light transforms, reveals, and sometimes obscures an object. Transparency can be an illusion of refracted or reflected light when it passes over and through a physical structure. I am interested in the potential and emotive power of light. It can imbue a simple architectural form with metaphoric meaning beyond its literal materiality and structure. What is transparent and what is solid in architecture? Light and shadow can confuse, delight, and confound our experience inside and outside a space.

In Lightforms 1 and 2, I photographed multiple locations in varying lighting conditions and layered the imagery. I then made archival prints of my photographs, mounted them onto wooden panels, and painted on the surface with cold wax and, in some areas, oil paint. The application of wax and the selective burnishing and build-up in areas of the surface adds subtle texture to the print surface and furthers the illusion of the structure, depth, solidity, and transparency of the architectural forms.

liarothstein.com

Lia Rothstein
Lightform 2

My Lightform series is about the ways that light transforms, reveals, and sometimes obscures an object. Transparency can be an illusion of refracted or reflected light when it passes over and through a physical structure. I am interested in the potential and emotive power of light. It can imbue a simple architectural form with metaphoric meaning beyond its literal materiality and structure. What is transparent and what is solid in architecture? Light and shadow can confuse, delight, and confound our experience inside and outside a space.

In Lightforms 1 and 2, I photographed multiple locations in varying lighting conditions and layered the imagery. I then made archival prints of my photographs, mounted them onto wooden panels, and painted on the surface with cold wax and, in some areas, oil paint. The application of wax and the selective burnishing and build-up in areas of the surface adds subtle texture to the print surface and furthers the illusion of the structure, depth, solidity, and transparency of the architectural forms.

liarothstein.com

Melissa Rubin
Propagation

My work is a manifestation of my interaction with the ocean environment and draws inspiration from the light and tones of the open sky, beach, and water. The surfaces create a feeling of place, yet also are a conduit through which light can emanate and radiate. These pieces incorporate the intensity and earthiness of powdered pigments, as well as the translucency of wax, and the luminosity so inherent in the medium. I choose materials that help to facilitate a sense of mystery and light, both internal and external. The media I choose functions as my vocabulary of expression, as well as standing in as proxy to emotional states of mind. I think of my work as places to come to rest, both physically and emotionally, allowing the viewer a moment to reflect, looking outward as well as inward.

melissarubinart.com

Melissa Rubin
Rolling In

My work is a manifestation of my interaction with the ocean environment and draws inspiration from the light and tones of the open sky, beach, and water. The surfaces create a feeling of place, yet also are a conduit through which light can emanate and radiate. These pieces incorporate the intensity and earthiness of powdered pigments, as well as the translucency of wax, and the luminosity so inherent in the medium. I choose materials that help to facilitate a sense of mystery and light, both internal and external. The media I choose functions as my vocabulary of expression, as well as standing in as proxy to emotional states of mind. I think of my work as places to come to rest, both physically and emotionally, allowing the viewer a moment to reflect, looking outward as well as inward.

melissarubinart.com

Ruth Sack
Random River

Ultra Random and Random River rely on the transparent nature of encaustic to reveal layers of colored elements within a subtle composition. The elements in these pieces are debris left over from embellished sculptures that I was making at the same time. Leftover bits of colored and patterned wax were scattered on a surface that was then blanketed with hot encaustic wax. These bits revealed themselves as the surface was scraped away, depending on their height and meltability within the wax coverage. I practiced this technique many times in order to learn how to control the result. However, it is always surprising and somewhat accidental. I am always thrilled by this process of discovery. These paintings are truly non- objective and spontaneous, displaying the unique transparency that encaustic wax offers. 

ruthsackartist.com

Ruth Sack
Ultra Random

Ultra Random and Random River rely on the transparent nature of encaustic to reveal layers of colored elements within a subtle composition. The elements in these pieces are debris left over from embellished sculptures that I was making at the same time. Leftover bits of colored and patterned wax were scattered on a surface that was then blanketed with hot encaustic wax. These bits revealed themselves as the surface was scraped away, depending on their height and meltability within the wax coverage. I practiced this technique many times in order to learn how to control the result. However, it is always surprising and somewhat accidental. I am always thrilled by this process of discovery. These paintings are truly non- objective and spontaneous, displaying the unique transparency that encaustic wax offers. 

ruthsackartist.com

Sarah Springer
Seen | Unseen

In contemporary American society, young women are inundated with a pervasive narrative emphasizing physical attractiveness over intellectual prowess and individuality. Rather than being celebrated for their intellect, personality, and creativity, societal emphasis often fixates on physical attributes such as body shape, hips, and breasts. This hyper-focus on superficial appearance can lead to the overshadowing of their true essence, as the pressure to conform to societal beauty standards becomes all-consuming. Consequently, the authentic identity of these young women is often obscured, sacrificed at the altar of societal expectations.

sarahspringerart.com

Sarah Springer
Solitude

Transparency, that enigmatic interplay between visibility and concealment in human interaction, serves as a central theme in this piece. In fact, how do we truly see and understand our fellow human beings in any meaningful way? Too often, our comprehension of the complexities of interpersonal dynamics is surface deep, and often just plain wrong. A mask over a face, as in this piece, can be protective, or could be a symbol of control or imprisonment, or a warning to stay away, or even, as during the pandemic, a sign of caring for others. My interpretation is that her meditative expression and quiet repose suggest that the mask is a deliberate retreat from external chaos and distractions. But what do you perceive…?

sarahspringerart.com

Donna Hamil Talman
Shimmer 2

Shimmer 2 features Larvaceans, an unsung ocean hero. The piece conveys the sensibility of these tiny, delicate sea creatures. When they feed on dead plants and animals on the ocean’s surface, their food inevitably includes micro plastic particles. As their digestive remains fall to the sea floor, other sea creatures along the water column are spared eating that microplastic. 

The use of translucent paper waxes allow viewers to look through the work like you would with ocean water. 

donnahamiltalman.com

Marina Thompson
Vertigo Again

The original sketch for this painting was done one spring while pinned to my couch with an allergy induced case of positional vertigo. Every time I turned my head, my vision spun, doubled, and spun again creating that dizzy sensation children seem to love but honestly, who else? Green is the emerging color of the spring season combined with slightly disorienting, overlapping, visual vertigo artifacts.

marinathompson.com

Lelia Stokes Weinstein
Caught in the Sea

My current series involves the collaging of monotypes in oil and encaustic, found objects and papers with encaustic medium to create semi-translucent images. I often print on toilet paper roll wrappers and other thin papers. 

My intention is for viewers to explore and find their own unique narrative in the pieces.

The works selected are Layers of Depth and Caught in the Sea. Both works focus on developing a respect for the oceans that make up such an enormous and essential part of our earth. 

leliart.com

Lelia Stokes Weinstein
Layers of Depth

My current series involves the collaging of monotypes in oil and encaustic, found objects and papers with encaustic medium to create semi-translucent images. I often print on toilet paper roll wrappers and other thin papers. 

My intention is for viewers to explore and find their own unique narrative in the pieces.

The works selected are Layers of Depth and Caught in the Sea. Both works focus on developing a respect for the oceans that make up such an enormous and essential part of our earth. 

leliart.com

Charyl Weissbach
Lyre 35, Functional Extinction

I explore nature’s peacefulness and vastness within my encaustic mixed media paintings. These elements emit an aesthetic sensation of harmony, the illusion of timelessness, and feelings of inspiration that transcend space and time.

In Lyre 35, Functional Extinction, transparency becomes a metaphor for the fragility of coral reefs. Just as the harp-shaped Lyre coral symbolizes nature’s delicate balance, the transparent layers in my encaustic mixed media painting reflects the vulnerability of these ecosystems. Just as these layers allow glimpses into the depth of the ocean, they explore the delicate balance within nature and the challenges faced by coral reefs. The wax, applied layer by layer symbolizes the vulnerability of these ecosystems emphasizing the need for transparency in both artistic expression and environmental conservation. The juxtaposition of the serene nature-inspired piece with the harsh reality of coral acidification creates a visual dialogue on the urgency of preserving transparency in both art and environmental stewardship. The challenge of maintaining transparency in my creative process mirrors the struggle for transparency in our efforts to protect and restore the world’s coral reefs.

I am heartened how assisted organism evolution techniques performed in marine laboratories here and abroad, strive to save corals from extinction. Additionally, geoengineering technologies are helping to reduce atmospheric carbon dioxide and the acidity of  oceans without needing to drastically cut carbon emissions.

charylweissbach.com

Nancy Whitcomb
Floater

I like to stare at water, with all its movement, colors and moods. Encaustic paint can mimic water. It can be transparent as well as opaque. I have fun blasting molten encaustic paint with my heat gun, making waves and bubbles that recall those in the sea. And when the wax cools, the waves remind me of how the sea’s surface is constantly changing. I enjoy seeing how various swimming pools can look so different, depending on their shapes, the tiles and paint used, and their environments, indoors or out. I love studying the distorted forms of swimmers in a pool.

nancyspearswhitcomb.com

Nancy Whitcomb
Two Balls

I like to stare at water, with all its movement, colors and moods. Encaustic paint can mimic water. It can be transparent as well as opaque. I have fun blasting molten encaustic paint with my heat gun, making waves and bubbles that recall those in the sea. And when the wax cools, the waves remind me of how the sea’s surface is constantly changing. I enjoy seeing how various swimming pools can look so different, depending on their shapes, the tiles and paint used, and their environments, indoors or out. I love studying the distorted forms of swimmers in a pool.

nancyspearswhitcomb.com